News

February 18, 2016

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley will play a role in an upcoming space telescope project, formally set in motion this week by NASA, that will explore the mysteries of the expanding universe and observe alien worlds circling distant suns, among other science aims.

February 16, 2016

According to UC Berkeley seismologists, GPS instruments already in place around the world could provide more rapid and more accurate warning of a tsunami, allowing nearly 20 minutes more to evacuate coastal areas.

February 12, 2016

UC Berkeley scientists today are releasing a free Android app that taps a smartphone’s ability to record ground shaking from an earthquake, with the goal of creating a worldwide seismic detection network that could eventually warn users of impending jolts from nearby quakes.

February 10, 2016

According to a new finding by UC Berkeley and Exeter University biologists, world traffic in bee colonies is fueling a worldwide bee epidemic. The spread of the deformed wing virus, which is affecting European honeybee colonies and wild bee populations, is adding to fears over the future of global bee populations, biodiversity, agricultural biosecurity, global economies and human health.

February 9, 2016

The Washington Post
Our fear and disgust that cockroaches can quickly squeeze through the tiniest cracks are well-justified, say UC Berkeley scientists. Not only can they squish themselves to get into one-tenth-of-an-inch crevices, but once inside they can run at high speed even when flattened in half. This finding has inspired a robot that can rapidly squeeze through cracks — a new capability for search-and-rescue in rubble resulting from tornados, earthquakes and explosions.

February 2, 2016

The Obama administration and members of Congress today renewed their commitment to funding an earthquake early warning system along the Pacific Coast, with UC Berkeley’s Richard Allen predicting that such a system could reduce injuries from an earthquake by at least 50 percent.

January 29, 2016

In Japan and areas like the Pacific Northwest where megathrust earthquakes are common, scientists may be able to better forecast large quakes based on periodic increases and decreases in the rate of slow, quiet slipping along the fault, thanks to the work of Berkeley seismologists.
The Biological Sciences Division, in partnership with the School of Public Health, is proud to announce the launch of the Alliance for Global Health and Science. The Alliance for Global Health and Science seeks to build the scientific and public health research capacity in developing nations to address communicable and non-communicable threats to health within these countries.

January 19, 2016

Jennifer Doudna joined Joseph Biden this morning at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, as the vice president promoted a major new U.S. initiative to speed the discovery of cures for cancer, what President Obama has dubbed a “cancer moonshot.” Announced last week in Obama’s State of the Union address, the initiative will be the focus of Biden’s final year in office as he attempts to double the rate of progress against cancer.

January 14, 2016

Berkeley News interviews professor B. Lynn Ingram, a geologist specializing in paleoclimatology, to discuss what the climate could have in store for us.

January 7, 2016

A new techinique pioneered by a former UC Berkeley postdoctoral fellow uses ripples in the distribution of hydrogen gas to uncover the presence of invisible satellite galaxies which may be buzzing around or through the Milky Way.

December 18, 2015

In its year-end issue, the journal Science chose the CRISPR genome-editing technology invented at UC Berkeley as 2015’s Breakthrough of the Year. CRISPR was used to edit the muscle cells pictured below.

December 14, 2015

California Gov. Jerry Brown is headed to Paris this weekend for the two-week global climate summit, prepped for his meetings by a team of scientists almost entirely from the UC system, including two from UC Berkeley: William Collins, a professor of earth and planetary science and a Berkeley Lab researcher; and Anthony Barnosky, a professor of integrative biology.
The world’s most sensitive experimental search for dark matter has gotten 20 times more sensitive thanks to new techniques pioneered by the Department of Physics.
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment has already proven itself to be the most sensitive detector in the hunt for dark matter. Now with a new set of calibration techniques coupled with advanced computer simulations at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s (Berkeley Lab) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) and Brown University’s Center for Computation and Visualization (CCV) the detector’s sensitivity has dramatically improved again.

November 30, 2015

The UC Berkeley Astronomy department is using a supercomputer simulation (of a mere 10 milliseconds in the collapse of a massive star into a neutron star) to prove that these catastrophic events, often called hypernovae, can generate the enormous magnetic fields needed to explode the star and fire off bursts of gamma rays visible halfway across the universe.

November 23, 2015

According to two members of the Earth and Planetary Sciences Department, Mars’ largest moon, Phobos, is slowly falling toward the planet. But rather than smash into the surface, it likely will be shredded and the pieces strewn about the planet in a ring like the rings encircling Saturn, Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune.

November 19, 2015

During the Big Give, L&S alumni and friends showed us they think bigger by donating over $380,000 to the College! Thank you for your support, and for helping L&S reach further.

November 6, 2015

New York Times
Congratulations to our Berkeley faculty who received the famed Breakthrough Prize: Ian Agol, Breakthrough Prize Winners Kam-Biu Luk and Ian AgolMathematics and The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment team co-led by Kam-Biu Luk, Physics. Founded by Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki, Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, and Yuri and Julia Milner, the Breakthrough Prize honors important achievements in the categories of Fundamental Physics, Life Sciences and Mathematics.

October 8, 2015

A course on critical thinking at UC Berkeley, co-taught for the past three years by a public policy expert and a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, has generated a new proposal to remove sources of bias in research and improve confidence in published studies.