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Berkeley scientists investigate how types of fat might protect us from brain disease

September 8, 2016

An intriguing finding in nematode worms suggests that having a little bit of extra fat may help reduce the risk of developing some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

Conversations in science: Berkeley biologist Jennifer Doudna speaks with Dan Rather

September 12, 2016

Biochemist Jennifer Doudna speaks with journalist Dan Rather about new genome editing technologies and their implications for science, medicine, and society. This conversation in science was produced by iBiology.

Injustice comes to light with L&S's On the Same Page program

August 29, 2016

The idea behind On the Same Page is simple: if you give every incoming student at UC Berkeley a copy of the same book, you’re also giving them each something in common. With a school as large and diverse as Berkeley, establishing common ground with classmates can be challenging. On the Same Page tries to ease the process for incoming students — but the fact that this year’s title is both challenging and timely is no accident.

Notes from Understory: A Berkeley Biologist Gauges the Health of the Redwoods from the Ferns on the Forest Floor

August 29, 2016

Emily Burns, who got her PhD from Berkeley in integrative biology 2009 and is the science director of Save the Redwoods Leaguefinds that water is the critical determinant in fern size. 

Berkeley scientists and engineers team up to build the first dust-sized, wireless sensors

August 4, 2016

UC Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time.

Follow ocean-going robots, and scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley, for 10 days at sea

August 16, 2016

What’s life like aboard a scientific research vessel plying the California coast deploying robots to unlock important data about climate change? A team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley have just set out on such a venture. 

Berkeley neuroscientist goes inside the heroic snout of a rescue dog

August 17, 2016

Search-and-rescue dogs are prized for their ability to sniff out a hiker buried in deep snow. But how exactly do their noses work? UC Berkeley neuroscientist Lucia Jacobs is exploring the smell navigation mechanics of tracking dogs as well as smaller animals who use a similar olfactory GPS. Her research was featured on the PBS NewsHour Aug. 16, and is highlighted in the video below.

CRISPR-Cas9 breaks genes better if you disrupt DNA repair

August 18, 2016

CRISPR-Cas9 is the go-to technique for knocking out genes in human cell lines to discover what the genes do, but the efficiency with which it disables genes can vary immensely. UC Berkeley researchers have now found a way to boost the efficiency with which CRISPR-Cas9 cuts and disables genes up to fivefold, in most types of human cells, making it easler to create and study knockout cell lines and, potentially, disable a mutant gene as a form of human therapy.

The Wall Street Journal Profiles Physics Student and Olympian

August 10, 2016

Josh Prenot, a gold medal contender and Physics student, is featured in The Wall Street Journal.

The New York Times Profiles Berkeley Immunology Research

August 1, 2016

The New York Times profiles immunology research and the discovery made by Dr. Jim Allison during his tenure at the UC Berkeley.