Divisions & Units - Social Sciences

Steven Weber Deconstructs the Future, Bloc by Bloc

October 22, 2019

Steven Weber, a professor of political science and information and director of the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity makes his case on the future of the global enterprise in his new book, Bloc by Bloc: How to Build a Global Enterprise for the New Regional Order. Weber, one of the world’s most expert practitioners of scenario planning, argues that the worldwide network will not completely collapse, but will instead be redefined by the development of competing regional blocs.

Economist Ted Miguel awakens to Nobel Prize dream — well, almost

October 16, 2019

Berkeley eonomist Ted Miguel and his former Ph.D. adviser at Harvard, Michael Kremer, have worked on a poverty-fighting project in Kenya since the 1990s. This groundbreaking project was among the research cited in the announcement of Kremer's 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics, and Miguel has been invited to attend the ceremony.

Border walls don’t make us safer or stronger, says political scientist

October 15, 2019

When President Donald Trump was elected in 2016, he vowed to build a “big, beautiful wall” between the United States and Mexico. But the more than 700 miles of barriers already in place at the border — mostly built in the 1990s and early 2000s — have already created more harm than good, says Wendy Brown, a professor of political science at UC Berkeley.

First responders’ daughter fights fire with a mobile app

October 14, 2019

If adversity sparks innovation, the deadly Tubbs Fire fueled alumna Bailey Farren to develop Perimeter, a mobile app to help first responders and citizens alike respond more quickly when wildfires approach. Farren, who earned a double major in cognitive science and rhetoric, is the CEO of Perimeter and heads a seven-member team. Except for one, all are Berkeley alumni; among them is Trevor Greenan, whose childhood home burned in a wildfire in October 2017.

How to make billionaires pay their fair share of taxes

October 11, 2019

Co-authored with UC Berkeley economist Emmanuel Saez. Their new book is The Triumph of Injustice: How the Rich Dodge Taxes and How to Make Them Pay.

UC Berkeley, UCSF to tackle dyslexia with $20 million gift

September 12, 2019

A $20 million gift will support research at UC Berkeley and UCSF into dyslexia and similar neurodevelopmental language-processing disorders as part of the new UCSF-UC Berkeley Schwab Dyslexia and Cognitive Diversity Center. The joint program will draw on research in neuroscience, cognitive psychology, education and public health, among other disciplines. At UC Berkeley, it will be headquartered in Berkeley Way West, the building that houses the UC Berkeley Department of Psychology, School of Public Health, and Graduate School of Education. 

First-year Tate Archibald: ‘You never know the full story of anything’

September 3, 2019

Tate Archibald, 18, is a freshman from Santa Clara, California, and plans on double majoring in history and linguistics. “Not in a million years did I think that I would get into Berkeley or want to go to Berkeley," Tate says. "Then, I went to Cal Day, and I saw just how in love with the school every single person was... And I just knew that it was the kind of place I wanted to be.

Hundreds gather for symposium marking 400th anniversary of slave ship arrival

September 3, 2019

Last Friday, UC Berkeley initiated a year-long initiative commemorating the 400th anniversary of the forced arrival of enslaved Africans in the English colonies with a day-long symposium. It drew hundreds of attendees who heard from more than a dozen historians and social scientists about the impact and legacy of slavery in society today. This initiative at UC Berkeley and similar ones across the country are being organized in the spirit of the “400 Years of African-American History Commission Act” that was signed into law last year.