Divisions & Units - Biological Sciences

Biologists explore conjuring color in the lab

December 6, 2016

Research on colorful phenomena has inspired many technologies, from sensors to drug treatments, and has provided a glimpse into nature’s inner workings, from evolution to quantum physics. This article explores the various ways to generate color, both manmade and natural. 

Berkeley biologists discover new salamander species, world’s smallest, and it is already endangered

November 16, 2016

An international team of researchers who are reporting three new species of the world’s smallest salamander from the remote mountains of Oaxaca, Mexico, warn that the rare creatures are already in danger of dying out.

East West Alliance Symposium 2016

June 27, 2016
Frontiers in Health Research - October 30th - November 1st at University of California, Berkeley

Three Berkeley Neuroscience Faculty Awarded Klingenstein-Simons Fellowships

October 26, 2016

The Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Awards supports early career neuroscientists whose research may help us understand neurological and psychiatric disorders. Three of the eleven 2016 Klingenstein-Simons Fellowships were awarded to Berkeley Neuroscience Faculty! Congratulations to Stephen Brohawn, Evan Miller, and Michael Yartsev.

Four Berkeley projects garner $1.7 million from federal BRAIN initiative

October 17, 2016

Four UC Berkeley research teams will share $1.7 million from the federal government’s BRAIN initiative, part of $70 million in new grants announced Thursday, Oct. 13, by the National Institutes of Health.

Four UC Berkeley scientists receive prestigious NIH awards

October 18, 2016

Four UC Berkeley scientists have been recognized as innovators in their fields through new research grants awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Berkeley genome engineering technology paves way for sickle cell cure

October 12, 2016

A team of physicians and laboratory scientists has taken a key step toward a cure for sickle cell disease, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to fix the mutated gene responsible for the disease in stem cells from the blood of affected patients.

Research gives hope to those with head and facial deformities

October 6, 2016
Calcium, the main constituent of bone, turns out to play a major role in regulating the cells that orchestrate bone growth, a finding that could affect treatment for conditions caused by too much collagen deposition, such as fibrosis and excessive scarring, as well as diseases of too little bone growth. The finding by Michael Rape, the Dr. K. Peter Hirth Chair in Cancer Biology in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, and his colleagues at UC Berkeley came from study of the signals that tell undifferentiated stem cells in the very early embryo to mature into bone cells.