Current Students - Graduates

Berkeley mathematics pries Gotti away from dancing and skydiving … and Cuba

May 31, 2019

Two decades ago, UC Berkeley mathematician Paulo Ney De Souza co-authored a book, Berkeley Problems in Mathematics. That sparked a lifelong fascination with math for the Cuban-born Felix Gotti, who this month finished his dissertation and earned his Ph.D. in mathematics.

College Letters Science Graduate Fellowships

Divisions of Social Sciences, Arts & Humanities

Graduate Fellowships 2019-20

Graduate Student In Regalia Walking Past Tree to Commencement

Fossil barnacles, the original GPS, help track ancient whale migrations

March 25, 2019

A UC Berkeley study of fossilized barnacles is helping scientists reconstruct the migrations of whale populations millions of years in the past. The study, authored by integrative biology professor Seth Finnegan and doctoral student Larry Taylor, will help scientists understand how migration patterns may have affected the evolution of whales over the past 3 to 5 million years, how these patterns changed with changing climate and may help predict how modern whales will adapt to the rapid climate change happening today.

What ancient poop reveals about the rise and fall of civilizations

March 14, 2019

The pre-Columbian city of Cahokia was once among the most populous and bustling settlements north of Mexico. But by 1400 A.D., Cahokia’s population had dwindled to virtually nothing. While theories abound about what happened, AJ White, a Ph.D. student in anthropology at UC Berkeley, has studied ancient poop samples to connect the city’s 13th century population plunge – at least in part – to climate change.

Fiat Vox: For Malika Imhotep, devotion to black feminist study is a life practice

March 12, 2019

Malika Imhotep grew up in West Atlanta, rooted in a community that she calls an “Afrocentric bubble,” in a family of artisans, entrepreneurs and community organizers. Now, as a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of African American Studies at UC Berkeley, she’s studying how black women and femmes make sense of themselves in a society designed, in many ways, to keep them out.

New My Experience survey seeks better understanding of campus climate

March 4, 2019

A wide-ranging survey on campus climate starts today, and students, staff and faculty are encouraged to weigh in about Berkeley’s current efforts in pursuit of equity, inclusion and community building. The My Experience survey, the first Berkeley campus climate survey since 2013, is designed to uncover opinions on ways to improve the campus experience. It can be accessed here.

Face it. Our faces don’t always reveal our true emotions

February 25, 2019

A new study by UC Berkeley psychologists shows visual context — as in background and action — is just as important as facial expressions and body language in interpreting a person's state of mind. The findings, presented by David Whitney, a professor of psychology, and doctoral student Zhimin Chen, challenge decades of research positing that emotional intelligence and recognition are based largely on the ability to read micro-expressions.

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Sleep loss heightens pain sensitivity, dulls brain’s painkilling response

January 28, 2019

A new study led by Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley professor of neuroscience and psychology, has identified neural glitches in the sleep-deprived brain that can intensify and prolong the agony of sickness and injury. The findings, published Jan. 28 in the Journal of Neuroscience, help explain the self-perpetuating cycles contributing to the overlapping global epidemics of sleep loss, chronic pain and even opioid addiction.

Recorded sounds that plagued U.S. diplomats in Cuba just crickets hard at work

January 10, 2019

A mysterious noise that allegedly sickened employees at the US embassy in Cuba in a suspected "sonic attack" was actually just noisy crickets, says Berkeley integrative biology Ph.D. student Alexander Stubbs. The results of the study were revealed at the annual meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology.