News

January 21, 2019

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

A new study of mouse models of autism challenges the most common assumption about what goes wrong in brain circuits to cause disease symptoms. UC Berkeley neuroscientists demonstrated that while inhibition does decrease in the brains of these mice, altering the balance between excitation and inhibition, the changed balance does not affect spiking at all. Instead, this altered balance seems to be a compensatory mechanism that stabilizes brain activity in response to the disorder.

January 19, 2019

Cal Alumni Association

Kate Scott, Mass Communications ’05 is familiar with taking the road less traveled, from being Cal’s first female “mic man” to the first woman to call football on Pac-12 Networks. The Cal Alumni Association sat down with Scott to find out more about her journey, and to get tips for recent graduates facing the unpaved road ahead.

January 18, 2019

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Robert Alter, a professor of Hebrew and comparative literature, has completed a new translation of the Hebrew Bible after two and a half decades of work. In a new interview, Alter talks about what he hoped to achieve with his new translation - such as evoking the "beautifully expressive" Hebrew of the original text.

January 10, 2019

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

UC Berkeley researchers, including molecular and cell biology David Savage, have now made CRISPR gene editing even more versatile by giving it an “on” switch, allowing users to keep the Cas9 gene editor turned off in all cells except its designated target.

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

A mysterious noise that allegedly sickened employees at the US embassy in Cuba in a suspected "sonic attack" was actually just noisy crickets, says Berkeley integrative biology Ph.D. student Alexander Stubbs. The results of the study were revealed at the annual meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology.

January 9, 2019

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Ariel Bloch, who used his career at UC Berkeley as a way to fuse Arab and Hebrew culture, died in Richmond on Dec. 14 at the age of 85 after a lengthy illness. A professor in the Department of Near Eastern Studies, Bloch specialized in Arabic linguistics, but he took on Hebrew and Aramaic as subspecialties and did what he could to encourage a multilingual balance of both of the languages and the cultures.

January 8, 2019

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Daniel Weisz, an assistant professor of astronomy at UC Berkeley, was honored at this week’s meeting of the American Astronomical Society for his early-career research on relatively nearby “dwarf” galaxies using the Hubble Space Telescope.

January 2, 2019

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Most hummingbirds have bills and tongues exquisitely designed to slip inside a flower. But some male hummers have traded efficient feeding for bills that are better at stabbing and plucking other hummingbirds as they fend off rivals for food and mates, according to new research led by Integrative Biology postdoc Alejandro Rico-Guevara and co-authored by Professor Robert Dudley.

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

A “bumper crop” of prestigious awards, prizes and honors will be presented tomorrow (Wednesday, Jan.

December 21, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Take a look back at 2018 at UC Berkeley, featuring highlights from several L&S departments.

December 19, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Chancellor Carol Christ sends the following holiday message to the campus community.

December 15, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Chancellor Carol Christ had a clear message for the 600 UC Berkeley graduates at Saturday’s commencement ceremony: Think beyond yourself and attend to your civic life just as you do a personal and professional life.

December 11, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

As a boy, UC Berkeley psychology professor Stephen Hinshaw didn’t understand why his father kept disappearing. The discovery that his father had a severe mental illness inspired him to become a champion against the stigma his father faced, and his new new memoir, Another Kind of Madness: A Journey through the Stigma and Hope of Mental Illness, just won the American Book Fest’s 2018 award for best autobiography or memoir.

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Chancellor Carol Christ took a few minutes on Monday and again on Friday to deliver chocolate, sugar, raisin and red velvet cookies to students at Moffitt Library as they wrapped up semester-long research projects and crammed for big tests. “Cookies don’t finish papers," the Chancellor said, "but they help.”

December 10, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

According to a new study authored by molecular and cell biology professor Stephan Lammelthe brain neurotransmitter dopamine has a yin-yang personality, mediating both pleasure and pain. 

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

New York implemented changes last week to how Lyft and Uber drivers get paid in Manhattan, based on recommendations put forth by Michael Reich, professor of economics and co-chair, center on wage and employment dynamics at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment at UC Berkeley. Berkeley News interviewed Reich to discuss how the new rules came to be and if San Francisco Bay Area users of ride share services will soon find themselves following the New York model.

December 7, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ sent this message to the campus community late yesterday, regarding a new effort to advance and expand diversity among Berkeley's undergraduate population.

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

A portrait honoring David Blackwell, the first black man to get tenure at UC Berkeley, was unveiled this week in the residence hall bearing his name.  The portrait was commissioned by Richard Davis, a friend and former student of the late math professor Blackwell.

December 6, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Geckos are renowned for their acrobatic feats on land and in the air, but a new discovery that they can also run on water puts them in the superhero category, says a University of California, Berkeley, biologist. The study was conducted by U.C. Berkeley graduate students Jasmine Nirody, now a biophysicist at Oxford and Rockefeller University, and Judy Jinn.

December 3, 2018

UC Berkeley NewsCenter

Honeymoon long over? Hang in there. A new UC Berkeley psychology study shows those prickly disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance. Researchers found that as couples aged, they showed more humor and tenderness towards one another.